How Proper Snacks and Hydration Prove Beneficial for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Proper snacks and hydration are vital in keeping a healthy body. Sadly, preparing and eating decent meals may become difficult for people with weakened cognitive functions. For those who are battling dementia or Alzheimer’s, bad eating habits may cause loss of weight and an increase in behavioral problems.

While dementia and Alzheimer’s are irreversible, patients still need to avoid certain types of food in order to boost their memory for as long as possible. Granted, they will not regain their full or partial memory, but eating healthy food at the right amount can help mitigate the damages. Here is a general guideline that experts prescribe to memory problem sufferers:

  • Eat a balanced diet. Make sure the food you eat are healthy such as vegetables, fruits etc.

 

  • Avoid food with high-saturated fat. While fat is still a necessary for a well-balanced health, too much of the bad types of fat are not healthy for the body. They can cause a host of problems such as obesity and heart ailments. Avoid butter, margarine and fat cuts in mean. Instead, opt for healthy oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil when cooking instead of butter.

 

  • Consume lean cuts of meat. Avoid cold cuts, sausages and processed meat as they hamper the brain function and can speed up the loss of memory. Load up on fish meat, particularly halibut, sardines and tuna, which are proven to reduce the risk of memory loss.
  • Avoid sugar, especially white sugar. Go for healthier forms of sugar found in fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, plums and cherries.

 

  • Other memory boosting ‘superfoods’ are coffee, cinnamon, kale, spinach, chocolate, and flax seed.

 

There is no cure for dementia and Alzheimer’s at the moment, and eating these ‘superfoods’ does not guarantee a return of memory. However, they can potentially delay the progression of these diseases. Healthy individuals can also consume them to stave off memory problems.